Southern Hospitality is LA’s Coolest Rap Party…And It’s Free

LA Weekly

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If you want to hear rap and hip-hop on a weekend night in the City of Angels, your options are limited. If you’re willing to dress up, pay a cover and order bottle service, you can head to the clubs in Hollywood. If you’d prefer something more laid-back, you could choose a hipster dive bar, but be prepared for a track list of overplayed, run-of-the-mill, old-school jams. Or you could opt for a warehouse party filled with kids half your age.

“There seems to be no middle ground in the rap club scene,” says British DJ and promoter David Sadeghi, better known in the hip-hop scene as Davey Boy Smith. Luckily for hip-hop heads, Sadeghi has a solution to this problem in the form of a monthly rap dance party called Southern Hospitality at Los Globos.

The event, which has been held in London in various forms and iterations since 2004, is the antithesis of what one would normally expect from a rap party. It’s not scene-y or gaudy, but laid-back and welcoming. The dance floor is huge and if you want to twerk sans smirks and Miley Cyrus references, this is the place to do it (there’s even mirrors on the walls so you can watch your performance).

(Click here to read more)

Lil Debbie’s New EP, Home Grown, Is An Ode To Weed

LA Weekly

IMG_3210 It’s Friday night, a little after 10:30, and I’m hoofing it through Hollywood to a spot called Las Palmas where Lil Debbie is premiering her new EP, Home Grown. There are stragglers hanging out front and they’re all young, definitely not over the age of 25, some of them probably not even over 21, which I assume is why they are hanging outside to begin with. Because that’s the thing about rap and hip-hop shows: They’re always mired with youngins.

The last — and only — time I saw Lil Debbie was back in 2013 at a place called Venue in downtown Oakland. The Venue is one of those multi-use spaces with a stage and a bar and lots of floor space, and I remember being impressed with the size of the room when I got there. Impressed because I didn’t know much about Lil Debbie, other than the fact that she was in the White Girl Mob, and impressed because I hadn’t been to a rap show since high school.

V-Nasty was there, and probably Kreayshawn, too, but all I can remember is Lil Debbie strutting across the stage in a pair of silk boxer shorts, gesticulating and waving the mic around. Her tiny, 5’2″ frame was a mere wisp compared to V-Nasty, and yet she was just as fierce, just as tough. The rest of the night is a blur — let’s be honest, I probably drank one too many glasses of Moscato — but I remember watching her perform as if it were yesterday.

(Click here to read more)

I Wore Pasties At EDC And It Wasn’t That Bad

LA Weekly

It’s easy to make friends when you wear pasties at EDC. I would know. I did it last night.

I didn’t plan for this to happen. When I packed for the festival, I chose regular clothes—shorts, tank tops, a sundress. You see, I’m not a raver and I’d never been to a rave before, so I had no idea what to expect. Actually, that’s not true. I once saw a gaggle of girls dressed in tutus and furry boots leaving a hotel in downtown L.A., apparently on their way to a rave. So I knew enough about rave culture to recognize the tropes: the boots, the bracelets, the drugs, the glow sticks. I just had no idea what to expect once I got there.

I barfed and went home early on my first night at EDC. I’d drunk too little water and inhaled too much dust. I was also completely and utterly overwhelmed. The last time I’d gone to a large-scale musical event was back in 1999 to see The Spice Girls at the Forum. (I must admit, even though I am a music journalist, I’ve never been to a music festival — not even Coachella.) Needless to say, I was wholly unprepared for the sheer size, scale and volume of the event.

And then there were the outfits — or rather, lack thereof. Girls were wearing panties and bras and thongs like it was the most normal thing in the world. Of course, it was over 100 degrees outside, and I sure as hell am no Mormon. But still, I was shocked. One girl wore a unitard made entirely of (thin) black duct tape. Others seemed to have given up on clothes all together. (Click here to read more)

Tokimonsta Mixes Hip-Hop and EDM For The EDC Masses

LA Weekly

tokimonsta_marcotorres_5It’s a little past 11 o’clock on Friday and the Las Vegas Motor Speedway is pulsing with sound, lights and bodies. Polyester jellyfish and gigantic LED mushrooms hover above the crowd; the smell of funnel cakes and body odor wafts through the 100-degree air on this first night of EDC Las Vegas. Dust and dirt coalesce into one invisible mass, infiltrating the throats and nasal passages of thousands of ravers, their plastic beaded bracelets click-clacking as they record videos with their smartphones and chug Powerades and syrupy cocktails. A never-ending torrent of synths and molecule-rearranging bass tumble from myriad speakers throughout the 2.5-mile-long complex.

At each stage, a different gradation of EDM plays, as artists and DJs spin melodies, adjust volumes, and tweak tempos. The beat drops, building into an explosive climax at one stage, while a steady wave of trance hypnotizes the crowd at another. Elsewhere, a percussive house jam segues into a drum solo. And over there, to the north, a tinkle of bells unfurls into an Indian-laced flute melody and the crowd goes wild as they recognize the beat to Nas’s “Oochie Wally.”

This is not what they were expecting. This is hip-hop, not EDM. But wait. Don’t you hear the bass? The electro tinge? Isn’t what you’re doing with your feet called dancing? And isn’t that, by virtue of its various qualities, the very definition of electronic dance music?

You nod your head “yes” and wave your bangled arms in the air. This is EDM, you decide. And that blue-haired DJ on the stage knows what she’s doing, you realize. She’s blurring the lines between genres. She’s breaking the rules. She’s pioneering a new sound. (Click here to read more)

HOW AN L.A. BLOCK BECAME ANALOG ALLEY, A DESTINATION FOR ALL THINGS RETRO

LA Weekly

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Most of the time, when people talk about Sawtelle Boulevard, they mention the Japanophile stretch near Olympic, known as Little Osaka, where you can buy authentic red bean mochi, Sanrio knickknacks and mouthwatering ramen. (The general area around the stretch is now technically known as Sawtelle Japantown). But if you walk a few blocks north of that stretch, toward Santa Monica Boulevard, you’ll discover Analog Alley.

It’s where the eight-decade-old Nuart Theatre shows indie and cult films and where you can rent videos from one of the last independently owned video stores in the city. You’ll find a record store with a hammock hanging out front and a used bookstore with a tintype photography studio. Down the side street of Idaho Avenue, there’s another used bookstore, this one filled with gewgaws and doo-dads from yore. If you want a slice of the past, this is where you go.

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Two or three years ago, recalls Sebastian Mathews, the owner of Touch Vinyl and Cinefile Video, “there’s these little obsolete businesses around and we were all starting to feel that analog needs to come to the forefront.” As a result, local shopkeepers decided to brand the area Analog Alley, and since then, foot traffic and business in general have improved. (Click here to read more)

Son Of A Cocaine Dealer, Rapper Bricc Baby Lives Up To His Name

LA Weekly 

MPA_Shitro_Karte 2_001 It helps to have friends in high places. Just ask Bricc Baby, an underground L.A. rapper who came out with his second mixtape (Nasty Dealer) in April.

Bricc grew up in South L.A., where he befriended a young Kid Ink and Casey Veggies. Later, he moved to Atlanta where he met Future, Young Thug, Young Scooter and Peewee Longway. The Atlanta gang taught him how to freestyle, and he was Casey Veggies’ driver for his first tour. He formed Batgang with Kid Ink, who also helped the young rapper choose his name (he was formerly MPA Shitro, Shitty Montana and Bricc Baby Shitro) and took him on tour in both Europe and the United States.

“Yeah, I’m pretty lucky,” says the 27-year-old MC. “I’m blessed to be in a position where I run into people that are real heavy in the game.”

(Click here to read more)

L.A.’s Smallest Radio Station, 97.5 KBU, Broadcasts Out Of A Malibu Bedroom

LA Weekly

Hans Laetz and his "KBU" car

Hans Laetz and his “KBU” car

The KBUU-FM radio studio is in a ranch-style tract house, on a cul de sac on one of Malibu’s few suburban-style streets. In what used to be Emily Laetz’s bedroom, the detritus of a recently moved-out kid is everywhere. Puka shell necklaces hang near the door and a stack of Malibu High School yearbooks is piled on the desk, along with an LP (The Doors’ Greatest Hits) and a wadded up clump of bathing suit. On the wall are a tide calendar from 2011 and a homemade a poster that says “Big Dume September 2007.”

In the middle of the room are two racks of gear, diodes lit and blinking, volume meters flashing, data lines flickering. At a white desk surrounded by computer screens, speakers and a 20-year-old radio console sits Emily’s dad, Hans Laetz. A greying 58-year-old of average height, with a thick slab of mustache and a wardrobe of Hawaiian shirts, Laetz is the guy behind “Radio Malibu,” 97.5 KBU. (He was also formerly this writer’s editor at another publication.)

He perches on a stool and leans into an Electro-Voice RE320 mic to record his PSAs and newscasts. He attempts six different voices — “I don’t always want to sound like me” — and launches into a promo using what he fancies to be his “sexy FM voice.” He reserves the “KNX news voice” for the newscasts between 6:45 and 9:15 a.m., and the “Irwindale Dragway” voice for PSAs. (Click here to read more)

Dustin Lovelis Courts A New Sound After The Fling

OC Weekly

When the Long Beach quintet, The Fling, took a hiatus in 2013, front man Dustin Lovelis kept working. He penned songs and produced demos. In time, he met producer and bassist for Everest, Elijah Thomson, and they began working on a record. Composer and session man, Frank Lenz, was added to the mix and then a session at Elliott Smith’s former home, New Monkey Studios, was booked. Two days later, an album was born.

dustinlovelis1-thumb-560x408On a recent Saturday night, Lovelis’ premiered the project, Dimensions, at the downtown Long Beach event space, Howl. Over a hundred people arrived at the BYOB event to hear the vintage-sounding guitarsmith’s debut solo album of raw and honest pop ballads. “This is my first effort to do something on my own,” says Lovelis. “And I think it’s the most me out of anything I’ve ever released.

The 11-track album is largely autobiographical and draws from material—emotions, memories, experiences— in Lovelis’ past. “I think it kind of sums up who I am as a person at different periods of time,” he says. Lovelis started writing the songs six months after The Fling broke up, a time in his life that coincided with other negative events, like losing his job, his girlfriend and dog, all in the same week. (Click here to read more)

Miami’s Lil Champ FWAY Is Focused On The Music

Miami New Times

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On Sunday, Carol City rapper, Lil Champ FWAY, headed to the stinky and smoky trade show known as Cannabis Cup in Denver, Colorado, to usher in the unofficial stoner holiday, 4/20. Before surrendering himself to the hazy interiors of Denver Mart, he took some time to talk with New Times about his latest EP, Pray 4 FWAY; what’s next on his agenda; and what he’s doing in Atlanta. 

New Times: 
Last time we talked to you was a few years ago when you were in LA. Are you in Miami now?

Lil Champ FWAYI’m in Atlanta right now, but I have shows in Miami in June, so I’ll be there in June.

What brought you to Atlanta?
I got cousins that stay up here. And I had come up here for A3C, and I linked up with Coach K from Quality Control — he’s the CEO of the label the Migos are on. I’ve just been up here trying to work with artists. You know, I linked up with Playboi Carti from Awful Records. Really, I’m just up here working. That’s really it. (Click here to read more)

Oaklandish: Booming Business Rooted in Oakland Pride

San Francisco Chronicle

920x920 Running a business as large and varied as Oaklandish — ranked 33rd on Fortune’s list of the 100 fastest-growing inner-city companies in America last year — isn’t easy. On the eve of the brand’s recent yearly warehouse sale, with a website revamp under way and spring line about to roll out, owner and founder Angela Tsay sat down to talk about Oaklandish’s circuitious journey.

“I think sometimes people think we’ve had it really easy, but it has been hard,” she explained. “We’ve really done a lot of this ourselves.”

In the last nine years, Tsay has turned what started out as a T-shirt stand at a farmers’ market into an apparel empire, beloved and recognized by an entire city. The Oakland institution now has three store locations, a warehouse in Jack London Square and two offshoot brands, Oakland Supply Co. and NSEW. Instead of mere T-shirts and sweatshirts, it now makes everything from beanies and underwear to knee socks and coffee mugs. The brand, which once had trouble persuading San Francisco stores to sell its gear, is now sold in a dozen stores all over the Bay Area and has customers worldwide.

“Oaklandish has had great success,” Tsay said. “But we did not have some grand plan. It just kind of came together.” (Click here to read more)

Wiener Records: The Label That Says ‘Yes’ To Everyone

OC Weekly

wiener1-thumb-560x560 Record labels are exclusive by nature. They are purveyors of taste, harbingers of new talent. Getting signed is a milestone in any artist’s career. But what happens if anyone can join a label? Does it still mean something? What happens to a member’s-only club when everyone becomes a member?

At Wiener Records, anyone can be a Wiener. The business model behind the Burger Records offshoot is remarkably simple. Bands pay anywhere from $250 to $650 for the manufacturing of 100 tapes; plus, they get social-media shoutouts and their music sold on its website. “The point of Wiener is that everyone can do it,” says Danny Gonzales, the “head guy” behind the record label. “You can literally burp on a mic for 20 minutes, and I’ll put it out.”

If that bar sounds low, it’s because it is. Wiener’s mission isn’t so much about discovering new talent as it is about making music manufacturing egalitarian. Sure, you’ve got to pay a small fee, but, as Gonzales points out, that covers manufacturing costs. Tapes are cheap and relatively fast and easy to make. Compared to the $1,500 that getting 100 LPs manufactured costs, the Wiener deal is a bargain. Manufacturing takes about two weeks for tapes, while it can take anywhere from 14 to 16 weeks for LPs. And unlike digital files, tapes are tangible. “For your fans who care about you, they want to have a memento or something to remember the show by,” says Burger Records co-founder Sean Bohrman. “For the most part, I think anyone can afford [a tape].”

(Click here to read more)

Phillip Pessar Photographs Miami’s Rapidly Changing Landscape

Miami New Times

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Phillip Pessar‘s Flickr stream reads like a love letter to Miami. In roughly 9,600 photos, it tells the story of South Florida’s ever-changing architectural landscape.

The photos are simple — many of them head-on shots of old department stores, abandoned burger joints, historic hotels, and bulldozed office buildings. There are no fancy editing tricks or filters, just straightforward photography. Every day, almost without fail, new pictures are added. And all consist of the same thing: images of Miami and South Florida architecture in various stages of decay, disarray, remodeling, or rebuilding.

His photos are regularly used in articles and on news blogs. They’re in the Huffington Post, Forbes, USA Today, and theMiami Herald, to name just a few. They’re also featured in cookbooks, travel guides, insurance advertisements, and real-estate blog posts. But in the ten years Pessar has been taking photos, he hasn’t seen a dime. His work is available under Flickr’s Creative Commons and can be used by anyone as long as they give him credit.

Though Pessar’s photographs might be unremarkable, he has found a niche cataloging the mundane and quotidian: a bankrupt Radio Shack location, a Wet Seal store going out of business, an Airstream trailer outfitted into a food truck. (Click here to read more)

Goth Money Records’ ‘Trap Goth’ Is Taking Over The Internet

LA Weekly

gothmoney2 At a Denny’s on Wilshire Boulevard, four of the six members of Goth Money wait eagerly for their first meal of they day. Even though it’s two o’clock in the afternoon, they all order breakfast plates. Unfortunately, the cook is behind on his orders; their food won’t be out for another 45 minutes. To pass the time, they twiddle with their cell phones, watch March Madness, and check their social media fan mail.

“We get a lot of mail,” said MFK Marcy Mane, the group’s lead producer and sole City of Angels resident. “Shit is crazy.”

He reads a Tumblr message from a fan in Houston, begging the crew to visit the Space City before he leaves for the Navy, and a plea from a fan who wants to tour with them. “‘Let me travel with y’all and take photographs of your shows and make beats with y’all,’” MFK Marcy Mane reads aloud. “‘Please, I don’t like school.’”

“Stay in school,” says Kane Grocerys, one of the group’s rappers.

“Please, stay in school,” echoes another Goth Money rapper, LuckaLeannn.

“All these 12-year-old rappers,” MFK Marcy Mane murmurs.

“They’ve got to chill out and experience life,” rapper Black Kray adds from the other side of the table. (Click here to read more)

Wiener Mania Offers A Sweaty Appetizer To Burgerama

OC Weekly

Step Panther

  Step Panther

The Australian band Step Panther arrived in Fullerton a few hours before their show at The Continental Room, so they decided to head to Costco. “We thought maybe they had guns there,” explained singer Stephen Bourke. “Yeah, we just wanted to see some guns,” the guitarist, Zach Stephenson added.

They’d flown in from a city “near Sydney” a few days earlier and were staying in an Air Bnb in Los Angeles. So far, they’d visited Santa Monica and Venice beaches and, of course, Hollywood. It was their first visit to the City of Angeles, let alone the West Coast, and it kind of reminded them of a mash-up of Sydney, Perth and Melbourne, “just with more freeways and wider roads,” said Bourke.

Earlier that day, they’d gone shopping for guitars because they hadn’t brought their own. They had tourist visas, not performance visas, explained Bourke, and they were scared of tipping the government off to the fact that they were actually touring the U.S.

Bourke: “We just heard a lot of bad stories from other Australian bands warning us to not bring anything…. I guess it sounds stupid now.”

Stephenson: “Yeah, it sounds ridiculous.”

Bourke: “We should have brought them.”

(Click here to read more)

Chromeo’s Dave 1 Talks “White Women” and the “Kanye School” of Music

Miami New Times

Chromeo_Interview_2015David Macklovitch is almost naked during our interview. Unfortunately, it’s over the phone.

“Yeah, I’m walking around in my underpants, trying to figure out what jeans I’m going to wear,” says the 36-year-old musician, also known as Dave 1, who makes up half of the band Chromeo. “I’m pacing around. I’ve got my socks on, my underpants on, and I’m like half groomed and half not.”

He’s on his way to the studio and he’d probably be listening to Chief Keef or Nicki Minaj’s “Truffle Butter” if we weren’t talking right now. “I listen to the same shit as everybody else,” he says. “I also drink water and sleep.”

The fact that Macklovitch listens to hip-hop is both surprising and not. For more than a decade, he and his Chromeo partner, Patrick Gemayel, have been making ultra-funk dance jams that are heavily saturated with synthesizers and reminiscent of the ’80s. And yet, when the duo first started making music in the early ’90s, hip-hop was what they listened to — so hip-hop was what they made. “I grew up with hip-hop,” says Macklovitch, who met Gemayel at a private school in Montreal. “Hip-hop was really a vehicle for us to discover music.” (Click here to read more)

With His New Vibe Rap Sound, Mani Coolin’ Is Heating Up

LA Weekly

manicoolin3On a dead end street bordering the Hollywood Freeway, Mani Coolin’ sits on a stool in a makeshift home recording studio. His dad is here, as well as his producer, Jay Kurzweil, who owns the studio and lives in the adjoining apartment. A hazy, piano-laced beat emanates from the speakers and a muted kung fu movie plays on one of the computer screens. They’re listening to un-mastered tracks from Mani’s upcoming album, Hope4TheYouth. For the last two months, Mani and J. Kurzweil have spent days on end sitting in the foam-padded studio mixing the album’s songs.

“It’s the worst part,” the 21-year-old rapper says. “It’s just sitting here listening to a song over and over until we get it right.”

For the most part, the mixing process is done. In a few days, the songs will be sent to an engineer for mastering and on March 12, the album will drop.

“The whole time I was plotting for this right here,” Mani says, whose real name is Demani Brown. He glances at his iPhone, which has a promotional “#Hope” sticker plastered on the back, to check the time. In a half-hour, his dad will drive them to a soundstage in North Hollywood so that Mani can practice for his performance at the Rolling Loud Festival in Miami on Feb. 28. (Click here to read more)

10 Best Used Bookstores In Los Angeles

LAist

We may live in an age of digital and e-books, but don’t let that fool you. Print is still alive in the City of Angels from Inglewood to Eagle Rock. The stores that made our list were chosen based on a number of criteria, like collection size, pricing, ambiance and orderliness (and extra points were awarded for establishments with a store dog or cat). We searched and high low for the best of the best, so chuck your Kindle and use our list to help you locate the bookstore nearest you. As always, leave your own favorites in the comments.

 

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Friends Book Shop

Of all the used bookstores on this list, none have greater deals or a greater selection than the Friends Book Shop. Located inside the Beverly Hills Public Library, this used bookstore (which is the only bookstore in Beverly Hills, aside from Taschen on Beverly Drive) has a wide variety of books, from fiction, art, and children’s to classics, first editions, and signed copies. It’s been around since 1991 and is run and operated by the Friends of The Beverly Hills Public Library, a garrulous, friendly bunch of senior citizens who are eager to chat about books and help you find whatever you are looking for. Their collection is built from donations to the library and their prices are jaw-droppingly low. They’ve got both a $1 rack and a 25-cent rack, and the bulk of their books cost between $3 and $4. Their specialties are cookbooks, paperback mysteries and coffee table-sized art books. In addition to books, they sell audio books, DVDs and current magazines.

Friends Book Shop is located in the Beverly Hills Public Library at 444 North Rexford Drive in Beverly Hills, (310) 288-2271.

(Click here to read more)

Carol City Rapper N3ll Raps About “The Life of a Kid From a City That Doesn’t Understand Him”

Miami New Times

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If you follow internet rap, then chances are you’ve heard something from Miami’s latest underground phonk rapper, N3ll. Though he’s been making music since 2008, word has only started getting out about the young MC these past few years.

His 2014 mixtape, Boyz N the Hood, was a SoundCloud sensation, with featured songs by Miami’s current golden boy, Denzel Curry. Last week, he dropped his newest mixtape, The Screw Tape, a hazy, ’90s mashup with features by Amber London and Twelve’len.

Crossfade got a chance to interview the burgeoning artist about his musical origins and future plans. Who is N3ll? we wondered. Where did he come from? How did he get into into rap, and where is he going with it? Read the interview to find out.

New Times: What is your real name?

N3ll: Darnell.

How old are you?
I’m 20. I’m about to be 21 at the end of this month.

Where did you grow up?
I grew up in the heart of Miami, Carol City, where everything goes down. I’ve actually been in this area since I was born. You know, I’ve never been anywhere other than Miami unless I was traveling for music or something. This is where I’ve lived my whole life. (Click here to read more)

The Breakfast Club’s Angela Yee Serves It Hot

Wesleyan Magazine

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“Don’t screw this up,” Jay-Z joked when he bumped into Angela Yee ’97 in the hallway. She laughed—she’d known Jay-Z for years and was used to his quips—but still, he was right. Oh man, she remembers thinking, the pressure is really on now.

It had been a little over two months since she started co-hosting a morning show at Sirius Satellite Radio and they still hadn’t hired her. Because she’d never worked in radio before, they put her on a trial period with no pay and no guarantee of getting the job. For the next few weeks, she worked diligently to prove herself by arriving early at the station and leaving late. She worked on slowing down her speech and making the inflection of her voice less monotone. She expunged words like “um” and “like” from her vocabulary. She watched popular television shows so that she could talk about them on the air and started a daily habit of reading gossip and news websites. She went to sleep early. She stopped socializing. “Every fiber of my being was dedicated to getting the job,” she recalls.

She told all of this to Jay-Z as they walked to the studio on that Wednesday morning in February of 2005. As luck would have it, the day was also a holiday: the Chinese New Year. That evening, Yee, who is half-Chinese, would be celebrating with her family over dinner, but first she had a show to do. (Click here to read more)

Kat Dahlia Talks Debut Album, My Garden

Miami New Times

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It’s been a tumultuous three years for singer-songwriter Kat Dahlia.

In 2012, the fledgling recording artist and former waitress signed a recording contract with Epic Records. A year later, she released her first single, the piano-laced hit “Gangsta,” which ranked 47th on Billboard‘s Hop R&B Songs of 2013 list and has garnered more than 15 million views on YouTube so far.

Two summers ago, Dahlia got pulled over for a DUI, but that hardly affected her career. In 2014, Complex ranked her debut album as the year’s 46th most anticipated album while she made plans for her first national tour.

But then things went south. She couldn’t hit her notes. Something was wrong with her voice. She had a cyst on her vocal chord, it turned out, and her singing career, she learned, was in jeopardy. Her tour was cancelled. Her album was put on hold. For 10 days straight, she couldn’t speak a word. She stopped socializing and became a hermit. She even changed her phone number. It took six months for her to fully recover, but by the end of 2014, she was back in the studio. She wrote some new songs. She went on tour. And most importantly, she finally finished her album. (Click here to read more)

Life in Color Festival 2014: “By the Time the Show Is Over, You’re a Piece of Art”

Miami New Times

Life-In-Color_Festival_Interview_Miami_2014

Sometimes, it takes a disaster to instigate change. In this case, it was undelivered packages.

By 2009, Life in Color (then called Dayglow) was picking up momentum. What had started two years earlier as a paint-throwing EDM party for college students in Tallahassee was now touring all over Florida.

More than a thousand people attended each event and upwards of 600 bottles of paint were used every night. Fans in other states clamored for a national tour; some, an international tour.

Business was so good that some of the party’s co-founders dropped out of college during their senior year to pursue the project as a full-time job.

A new movement had begun. Getting squirted, shot, and soaked with paint was what the people wanted and LIC was there to give it to them.

But on one particular day, a few hours before a Gainesville show, the party throwers encountered a problem: they had no paint. The packages containing their order were late. They were screwed. (Click here to read more)